Your browser (Internet Explorer 7 or lower) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.

X

Navigate / search

  • Our Bells

    The seven bells of Holy Trinity Cathedral are one of our great civic and ecclesiastical treasures. Five of the seven were a gift from Tsar Alexander III of Russia in thanksgiving for the miraculous preservation of his life (and those of his family) from an assassination attempt. Two other bells were locally recast by Garrett and Co. from older bells that melted during one of several fires that seriously damaged the temple in the course of the years. The largest bell of the set is a huge instrument of 5,765 pounds, and carries the following inscriptions (in Russian): "This bell was cast for the San Francisco Cathedral of the Orthodox American Mission during the Episcopate of Bishop Vladimir at the request of the hieromonk Joel, A.D. 1888." ...  Read More

     

  • Forgiveness

    In an Orthodox parish there is really nothing to compare to the unique Vespers of Forgiveness served on the very eve of Great Lent. Much has already been written about this Service elsewhere, and lots already has been said. All that remains is for us to come and to participate in the Vespers, ask forgiveness of each other, giving forgiveness to all—whether they ask or not—and supporting one another during the Lenten ascetic effort. The forty days of Lent—a tithe of our year—begins on Sunday, February 26 at 6:00 PM. If for some reason it is impossible to attend the Vespers, and that would be unfortunate, then find the time to seek out those from whom you need to ask forgiveness before you leave the church that day.

  • This Sunday

    How shall it be in that hour and fearful day, when the Judge shall sit on his dread throne! The books shall be opened and men’s actions shall be examined, and the secrets of darkness shall be made public. Angels shall hasten to and fro, gathering all the nations. Come ye and hearken, kings and princes, slaves and free, sinners and righteous, rich and poor: for the Judge comes to pass sentence on the whole inhabited earth. And who shall bear to stand before his face in the presence of the angels, as they call us to account for our actions and our thoughts, whether by night or by day? How shall it be then in that hour! But before the end is here, make haste, my soul, and cry: O God who only art compassionate, turn me back and save me. —a hymn of the day

  • This Week

    Wed, Feb 22: 6:00 pm Vespers

    Sat, Feb 25: 6:00 pm Vigil

    Sun, Feb 26: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, 6:00 pm Vespers of Forgiveness. BEGINNING OF GREAT LENT.

    Clean Mon, Feb 27: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Tues, Feb 28: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Wed, March 1: 7:00 am Matins, 6:00 pm Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts followed by lenten potluck

    Visit our full calendar of services

Holy Week and Pascha

Come, receive the light from the unwaning light, and glorify Christ Who is risen from the dead . . trampling death by death, and bestowing life on those in the graves.-Orthodox Resurrection hymn

The Eastern Orthodox calendar consists of a sequence of feasts and fasts commemorating the Incarnation and its fulfillment in the Church. Pre-eminent among all the festivals is Pascha, the Feast of Feasts, which determines all the movable feasts for the liturgical calendar.

The week before Pascha in the Orthodox Church, called Great and Holy Week, is set apart in the ecclesiastical year, so that we might stop and change our pace, meditate upon and relive the last week in our Lord's life which opened the doors of paradise. The events are presented as a drama bringing us to identify ourselves with them and elevate us in an all-embracing movement upward to God. As we relive the annual drama, we receive its benefits and allow the events to transform us into renewed Christians. We fully participate in the services as if actually entering God's Kingdom with hearts filled with faith, minds open to revelation, and a will of concern for spiritual ascent. The scenes take place in Jerusalem. The participants are real. The events, though historical, occur in the present. The laity responds to what it sees and hears... More

In the New Year...

As we switch our calendars over to 2014, let us take a few moments to fill in our paper and digital calendars with dates that are our first priorities.

Forgiveness Vespers, the beginning of Lent, will occur on the Sunday, March 2 at 6 PM. Each member of our parish should be present for this important and moving rite so that we can enter the Fast together. Clean week will be March 3-7.  Make a goal for yourself: to attend church at least once per day this week.  We have services three times a day during this opportunity to "purify our senses."

The Pascha of the Lord: His Last Supper, His Crucifixion, His Burial, and His Rising is celebrating April 17-20Now is the time to ask for time off from work and to notify loved ones, etc. that you have appointments that cannot be changed.

Our parish feast day, Pentecost, will be celebrated June 7-8. We experience the descent of the Holy Spirit on the Church, our parish, and ourselves as individuals in Holy Chrismation. We do not miss our family and friends' birthday parties -- this is the right weekend to be with your parish family.

Those with families or children can make a fun exercise of planning the year and being purposeful with our time by making family calendars, etc.  You can also check out great online resources such as OCA.Org or the "Online Chapel" of the Greek Archdiocese.

Pages