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  • Our Bells

    The seven bells of Holy Trinity Cathedral are one of our great civic and ecclesiastical treasures. Five of the seven were a gift from Tsar Alexander III of Russia in thanksgiving for the miraculous preservation of his life (and those of his family) from an assassination attempt. Two other bells were locally recast by Garrett and Co. from older bells that melted during one of several fires that seriously damaged the temple in the course of the years. The largest bell of the set is a huge instrument of 5,765 pounds, and carries the following inscriptions (in Russian): "This bell was cast for the San Francisco Cathedral of the Orthodox American Mission during the Episcopate of Bishop Vladimir at the request of the hieromonk Joel, A.D. 1888." ...  Read More

     

  • Forgiveness

    In an Orthodox parish there is really nothing to compare to the unique Vespers of Forgiveness served on the very eve of Great Lent. Much has already been written about this Service elsewhere, and lots already has been said. All that remains is for us to come and to participate in the Vespers, ask forgiveness of each other, giving forgiveness to all—whether they ask or not—and supporting one another during the Lenten ascetic effort. The forty days of Lent—a tithe of our year—begins on Sunday, February 26 at 6:00 PM. If for some reason it is impossible to attend the Vespers, and that would be unfortunate, then find the time to seek out those from whom you need to ask forgiveness before you leave the church that day.

  • This Sunday

    How shall it be in that hour and fearful day, when the Judge shall sit on his dread throne! The books shall be opened and men’s actions shall be examined, and the secrets of darkness shall be made public. Angels shall hasten to and fro, gathering all the nations. Come ye and hearken, kings and princes, slaves and free, sinners and righteous, rich and poor: for the Judge comes to pass sentence on the whole inhabited earth. And who shall bear to stand before his face in the presence of the angels, as they call us to account for our actions and our thoughts, whether by night or by day? How shall it be then in that hour! But before the end is here, make haste, my soul, and cry: O God who only art compassionate, turn me back and save me. —a hymn of the day

  • This Week

    Wed, Feb 22: 6:00 pm Vespers

    Sat, Feb 25: 6:00 pm Vigil

    Sun, Feb 26: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, 6:00 pm Vespers of Forgiveness. BEGINNING OF GREAT LENT.

    Clean Mon, Feb 27: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Tues, Feb 28: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Wed, March 1: 7:00 am Matins, 6:00 pm Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts followed by lenten potluck

    Visit our full calendar of services

The Manger and the Cross

"The Word became Flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth." These words from the first chapter of St. John's Gospel describe the Nativity of Christ in its eternal and mystical meaning. The Word that was with God and was God and "all things were made through Him and without Him was not anything made that was made." The Logos, which is the Greek original for the Word, represents the essence, the reason, the wisdom, the creative power and strength, the Word through which God created the world out of nothing. When God says, "Let there be," another book, the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Old Testament, speaks about it. This Word, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, the Son of God, today lies as a small defenseless child in the manger from which the animals eat, in the cave where the animals stay during stormy weather. The Word became Flesh, and this was possible only because humanity prepared for Him one of our kind, the Virgin Mary, Mother of God....

Suggestions for the Nativity Fast

The Nativity Fast is a gift that reminds us to slow down and be purposeful about how we are living these days leading up to the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord.

  • Pray for people: prepare a list of names, and once a week or more frequently pray the Supplicatory Canon to the Theotokos, or a portion of it. Ask the Theotokos to help those people.
  • Each week as you set aside the proportion of your funds to give to the Church in thanksgiving to God and for the operation of the parish, also set aside a portion to give to the poor. Then give it.
  • Celebrate the Feast of St. Nicholas (San Anselmo, Dec. 6) which spiritually ushers us—with joyful exuberance—into the Nativity season. 
  • Celebrate the Feast of St. Herman of Alaska, December 13 (here at the Cathedral).
  • Fast from meat, eggs, cheese, and all dairy. Abstaining from particular foods is really the easiest part of the fast. Much more effort is required when fasting from anger, criticism, resentments, and wandering thoughts, especially those of lust and envy and wasting time in idleness and pointless entertainments. Even more effort is required when we engage in works of mercy to the needy.
  • Attend Vigil on Saturday evening, and by doing so, prepare yourself for Communion on Sunday. Confess at least twice during the Forty Day Fast, one of those times in the week prior to Christmas.
  • Volunteer at one of the many charitable institutions in our city.
  • In the week before Christmas read the Nativity accounts from St. Matthew and St. Luke to your children.

(adapted from bulletin of St. Seraphim Church)

  • Dec 4 2016

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