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  • A Brief History of our Cathedral

    Holy Trinity Cathedral Parish traces its history to December 2, 1857, when the first Orthodox Society was founded in San Francisco. In those early years, the Orthodox population of the Bay Area was spiritually and sacramentally served by chaplains from Russian Navy ships that frequented San Francisco Bay. During the Holy Week of 1868, an Orthodox Priest was sent to the City from Alaska to conduct the Paschal services here... Read More

  • Walk for Life

    We are invited to participate in the Walk for Life and accompanying events on January 27.  His Eminence, our Archbishop Benjamin is planning in attending Liturgy on Saturday, Jan 27 at 8:30 AM (Holy Trinity Church, 999 Brotherhood Way) and a prayer service at the Civic Center Plaza (11:30 AM).  Posters and handouts for the Walk itself are posted at the church and available at the candle counter.

  • Honoring Fr John

    On Sunday, January 21, after a solemn celebration of the Divine Liturgy with our archbishop, we will continue our gathering in love to celebrate Fr. John’s ministry and retirement with a festive luncheon.  Let’s outdo one another in showing honor (Rom. 12:10) to Fr. John and Matushka Robin this Sunday!

    Our Annual Parish Meeting is scheduled for January 28.

  • Upcoming

    Wed, Jan 17:  6:00 PM Vespers followed by seminar.

    Sat, Jan 20:  6:00 PM Vigil.

    Sun, Jan 21: 10:00 AM Divine Liturgy followed by luncheon in honor of Fr. John. Parking available for morning service.

    Visit our full calendar of services.

Exaltation of the Cross

The Exaltation of the Cross is celebrated twice during the ecclesiastical year.  The first time, and one of the twelve great feasts, is September 14.  The second celebration occurs in the spring, at the vigil service of the third Sunday of Great Lent. Immediately after the singing of the Great Doxology of Matins, the Cross of Christ is brought in solemn procession to the center of the church building. It remains enthroned there for the entire middle week of Lent for the veneration and contemplation of the faithful.

The cross was the instrument of capital punishment in the Roman Empire in the time of Jesus. Criminals were executed by being tied or nailed to the cross. According to the Law of the Old Testament, anyone who was crucified was considered as a sinner cursed by God: Cursed be every one who hangs on a tree. (Deuteronomy 21 :23) . . . 

 

Nativity of the Theotokos

Nativity of the TheotokosThe traditional account of the Nativity of the Theotokos is taken from the apocryphal writings which are not part of the New Testament scriptures. The traditional teaching which is celebrated in the hymns and verses of the festal liturgy is that Joachim and Anna were a pious Jewish couple who were among the small and faithful remnant - “the poor and the needy” - who were awaiting the promised messiah. The couple was old and childless. They prayed earnestly to the Lord for a child, since among the Jews barrenness was a sign of God's disfavor. In answer to their prayers, and as the reward of their unwavering fidelity to God, the elderly couple was blessed with the child who was destined, because of her own personal goodness and holiness, to become the Mother of the Messiah-Christ...

  • Sep 4 2017

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