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  • Our Bells

    The seven bells of Holy Trinity Cathedral are one of our great civic and ecclesiastical treasures. Five of the seven were a gift from Tsar Alexander III of Russia in thanksgiving for the miraculous preservation of his life (and those of his family) from an assassination attempt. Two other bells were locally recast by Garrett and Co. from older bells that melted during one of several fires that seriously damaged the temple in the course of the years. The largest bell of the set is a huge instrument of 5,765 pounds, and carries the following inscriptions (in Russian): "This bell was cast for the San Francisco Cathedral of the Orthodox American Mission during the Episcopate of Bishop Vladimir at the request of the hieromonk Joel, A.D. 1888." ...  Read More

     

  • Forgiveness

    In an Orthodox parish there is really nothing to compare to the unique Vespers of Forgiveness served on the very eve of Great Lent. Much has already been written about this Service elsewhere, and lots already has been said. All that remains is for us to come and to participate in the Vespers, ask forgiveness of each other, giving forgiveness to all—whether they ask or not—and supporting one another during the Lenten ascetic effort. The forty days of Lent—a tithe of our year—begins on Sunday, February 26 at 6:00 PM. If for some reason it is impossible to attend the Vespers, and that would be unfortunate, then find the time to seek out those from whom you need to ask forgiveness before you leave the church that day.

  • This Sunday

    How shall it be in that hour and fearful day, when the Judge shall sit on his dread throne! The books shall be opened and men’s actions shall be examined, and the secrets of darkness shall be made public. Angels shall hasten to and fro, gathering all the nations. Come ye and hearken, kings and princes, slaves and free, sinners and righteous, rich and poor: for the Judge comes to pass sentence on the whole inhabited earth. And who shall bear to stand before his face in the presence of the angels, as they call us to account for our actions and our thoughts, whether by night or by day? How shall it be then in that hour! But before the end is here, make haste, my soul, and cry: O God who only art compassionate, turn me back and save me. —a hymn of the day

  • This Week

    Wed, Feb 22: 6:00 pm Vespers

    Sat, Feb 25: 6:00 pm Vigil

    Sun, Feb 26: 10:00 am Divine Liturgy, 6:00 pm Vespers of Forgiveness. BEGINNING OF GREAT LENT.

    Clean Mon, Feb 27: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Tues, Feb 28: 7:00 am Matins, 5:00 pm Hours and Vespers, 7pm Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete

    Clean Wed, March 1: 7:00 am Matins, 6:00 pm Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts followed by lenten potluck

    Visit our full calendar of services

Welcome to Holy Trinity

We gather for worship on Saturday evening and on Sunday Morning. We are old. We are young. We are middle aged. Some are married, some are single. Many of us have come to the Orthodox Church after years of searching. The Orthodox Church is the historical Church, which was founded on the day of Pentecost in Jerusalem and spread throughout Judea and finally the world. In our services we celebrate the great truths of the Christian Faith.

Holy Trinity Cathedral is named after the Godhead; God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit. This is particularly significant in that the Trinitarian understanding of the Godhead based upon the revelation of God, is uniquely Christian. The Orthodox Church has often been referred to as "the Church of the Holy Trinity" because of her commitment to the critical necessity of maintaining the Trinitarian faith. If God is One yet Three Persons as He has revealed Himself to be, and if we are created in the image and likeness of God, then understanding and living out this Trinitarian nature is critical to our life and faith...

  • May 15 2012

Forgiveness and the Gift of Lent

by Fr. Alexander Schmemann

A Homily delivered to the community at St. Vladimir's Orthodox Seminary

Forgiveness Sunday of 1983

As once more we are about to enter the Great Lent, I would like to remind us – myself first of all, and all of you my fathers, brothers, and sisters – of the verse that we just sang, one of the stichera, and that verse says:"Let us begin Lent, the Fast, with joy." 

Only yesterday we were commemorating Adam crying, lamenting at the gates of Paradise, and now every second line of the Triodion and the liturgical books of Great Lent will speak of repentance, acknowledging what dark and helpless lives we live, in which we sometimes are immersed. And yet, no one will prove to me that the general tonality of Great Lent is not that of a tremendous joy! Not what we call "joy" in this world – not just something entertaining, interesting, or amusing – but the deepest definition of joy, that joy of which Christ says: "no one will take away from you" (Jn. 16:22). Why joy? What is that joy?

So many people under various influences have come to think of Lent as a kind of self–inflicted inconvenience. Very often in Lent we hear these conversations: "What do you give up for Lent?" – it goes from candy to, I don’t know what. There is the idea that if we suffer enough, if we feel the hunger enough, if we try by all kinds of strong or light ascetical tools, mainly to "suffer" and be "tortured," so to speak, it would help us to "pay" for our absolution. But this is not our Orthodox faith. Lent is not a punishment. Lent is not a kind of painful medicine that helps only inasmuch as it is painful...

  • Feb 19 2017

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